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Submitted: 02 Sep 2022
Accepted: 14 Nov 2022
ePublished: 19 Dec 2022
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J Ren Endocrinol. 2023;9: e20062.
doi: 10.34172/jre.2023.20062
  Abstract View: 586
  PDF Download: 256

Case Report

Do antibacterial or antiviral filters protect operating room staff by preventing COVID-19 virus spread from cardiopulmonary bypass machine during open hear surgeries? A case report

Manouchehr Hekmat 1 ORCID logo, Hamid Ghaderi 1 ORCID logo, Zahra Ansari Aval 1* ORCID logo, Seyedeh Adeleh Mirjafari 2 ORCID logo, Mandana Hekmat 3 ORCID logo, Roshanak Tirdad 4 ORCID logo

1 Cardiovascular Research Center, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2 Department of Pediatric, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3 Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
4 Department of Neurology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
*Corresponding Author: Corresponding Author: Zahra Ansari Aval, Email: Z.ansari@sbmu.ac.ir, , Email: zahraansariaval@gmail.com

Abstract

Open heart surgeries are inevitable during pandemic and there is the possibility of corona virus transmission through oxygenated exhaust during cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP). In this study, researchers try to test the hypothesis by placing an antiviral and antibacterial filter in the air outlet of the oxygenator in order to prevent spread of COVID-19 virus in operating room. The COVID-19 positive patient needed emergency open-heart surgery due to her critical situation. The patient was under cardiopulmonary bypass for almost two hours. Antibacterial and antiviral filters were placed in oxygenator outlet. At the end of the procedure, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) swab was taken from both sides of the filter. The result of the test behind the filter was positive, but at the other side of the filter was negative. This may suggest, the exhaust air from the oxygenator can spread viruses into the room and the antibacterial and antiviral filters may be able to prevent operating room contamination. The installation of filter in the oxygenator exhaust can prevent the spread of COVID-19 viruses into the operating room air. Using this cheap and affordable method, operating room staff safety can be assured.

Citation: Hekmat M, Ghaderi H, Ansari Aval Z, Mirjafari SA, Hekmat M, Tirdad R. Do antibacterial or antiviral filters protect operating room staff by preventing COVID-19 virus spread from cardiopulmonary bypass machine during open hear surgeries? A case report. J Ren Endocrinol. 2023;9:e20062. doi: 10.34172/jre.2023.20062.
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